Everything You Need To Know About Lebanese Weddings

Ever since Soraya Belgacem, our Founder and Lead Event Planner, was a young girl, she’s loved two things… culture and events! So, growing up in a Lebanese family made her particularly fond of the extravagant Lebanese wedding!

At this stage in her career, Soraya has planned and attended many Lebanese celebrations, including her cousin’s multicultural wedding in Spain this past fall!

But whether a Lebanese wedding is in Lebanon, Spain, or here in the United States, it always has a similar flow. So, sit back and take some notes as Soraya shares, “Everything You Need To Know About Lebanese Weddings”.

Photography Credit: Rafael Swit Photography

MORNING ROSES: Every Lebanese wedding starts with this grand gesture. The groom sends the bride a gigantic bouquet of red roses with a love note to show how much he cares.

Photography Credit: Rafael Swit Photography

THE ZAFFEH: This is a traditional musical procession that includes drummers and dancers who are dressed in traditional garb and often carrying a sword. It occurs several times throughout the day and begins just before the ceremony.

Photography Credit: Rafael Swit Photography

Once the bride is ready, the groom’s family marches to her house to give her gifts (most often jewelry). When the groom’s family arrives, they are greeted with sweets, coffee, and champagne. In true tradition, the groom’s family would then accompany the bride to the ceremony/wedding venue.

Photography Credit: Lena Mirisola Photography

THE CEREMONY: Depending on which religion the couple identifies with, the ceremony could be Christian (Catholic, Maronite, Orthodox, Protestant) or Islamic, all of which have their own beautiful traditions!

Photography Credit: Rafael Swit Photography

CONTINUANCE OF THE ZAFFEH: After the ceremony, everyone moves to the reception. That is when the zaffeh continues (this time with the bride and the groom). It’s up to the couple to determine whether they enter the space together or have the groom go first followed by the bride. It’s also up to the couple to decide whether their zaffeh will be big (with dancers and drummers) or small. Either way, it’s always fun and lasts about 20 to 45 minutes.

Photography Credit: Lena Mirisola Photography

THE DABKE: This is a vibrant and energetic circle dance that starts with everyone surrounding the bride and the groom. It’s a great way to kick off the party and get guests on the dance floor.  The dabke begins during the zaffeh and could continue throughout the night.

Photography Credit: Lena Mirisola Photography